LBDA

Columbia University

The Research Center of Excellence is located at Columbia University Medical Center, in the Taub Institute and Department of Neurology Division of Aging and Dementia. The Center includes seven neurologists, two psychiatrists, two nurse practitioners, two social workers, and clinical and research staff.

The Center offers comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and management of individuals with cognitive and behavioral disorders. Evaluations may include cognitive testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging (DaT, SPECT, and PET scans), and laboratory and biomarker studies. The Center also provides social and case assistance services, supported in part by the the New York State funded Columbia University Center of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease (CEAD).

Participation in research studies is available, including observational studies and clinical drug trials.


Clinic name: Department of Neurology-Taub Institute
Phone number: (212) 342-5615 (Betina Idnay RN, nurse coordinator)
Website: Taub Institute

Lawrence S. Honig, MD, PhD, FAAN

Dr. Honig is a Professor of Neurology at Columbia University Medical Center. He is a neurologist with subspecialty in behavioral neurology and geriatric neurology, and a neuroscientist, whose efforts are particularly devoted to disorders of aging and degenerative brain conditions. His focus includes a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders including Lewy Body disorders, Alzheimer’s Disease, Frontotemporal Dementias including Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Degeneration, Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, and the immune-mediated encephalitides. He is Director of the New York State-funded Center of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease, and Deputy Director of the National Institutes of Health-funded Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Columbia University.

Karen Marder, MD, MPH, FAAN

Dr. Marder is the Sally Kerlin Professor of Neurology at Columbia University Medical Center. As a behavioral neurologist, she has cared for Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) patients throughout her career. Her interests span the genetic and environmental risk factors and treatment of cognitive, behavioral, and motor impairments in a range of neurodegenerative diseases, including LBD, Huntington’s Disease (HD), HIV dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). She has been the chief of the Division of Aging and Dementia since 2001, and associate director of the Columbia Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (CTSA).