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 Constant crying 
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Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 11:27 pm
Posts: 2
Post Constant crying
My first post EVER, here goes...

My 90-year-old Mom is in a memory care unit, enduring what appears to be the final stages of LBD. She has been the "poster girl" for this disease, has excellent caregivers, an LBD-savvy MD, and hospice involvement (started about 2 months ago). As I witnessed on a recent visit, and from what I have been told by staff & hospice, Mom spends a good portion of her few hours awake just crying---no tears, but lots of noise, moaning, whimpering. She managed to communicate that she can't help it, this from a woman who I think I saw cry only ONCE my whole life. She does have a superficial sore on her coccyx, but it is being tended to and does not appear to be the source of any pain. Aside from being heart-breaking and anguishing for her, Mom's crying behavior is distracting, disconcerting and upsetting to the caregivers, other residents, and her kids!

Based on requests from caregivers & hospice, I have made an appointment with her physician for a check-up next week. My questions for the forum are: has anyone else experienced a similar situation with uncontrollable spontaneous crying behavior? What medications have been successful in curbing such behavior? Right now she is on a low dosage of Ativan; I 've read that Zoloft, Praxil, Prozac and Lexapro may be helpful. Also Wellbutrin, BuSpar and Remeron. I want to be able to explore all options with her doctor, and would appreciate any recommendations.

Just watching my mother slip away over the past few years has been very painful, and to see her experience such unbridled sadness and despair at the end of her life is truly the last straw! If anyone knows of a miracle med or behavior control strategy, please respond.

Thanks in advance,

Katie


Wed Sep 12, 2012 1:23 pm
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Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2010 5:46 pm
Posts: 610
Post Re: Constant crying
Katie,

My mother is 88 years old and in mid-to-late stage (I guess--the stages are never clear to me). She was doing the same thing a few months ago until her doctor started her on Lexapro (she also gets Ativan as needed). It has helped tremendously and she isn't doing it anymore. Of course, everyone is different.

Also, when I was trying to figure out the crying thing, before the Lexapro, I read that crying, moaning and so forth can be self-soothing, and not exactly a distress signal as we usually think of it. That made sense to me because my mother would be crying and moaning, without tears, while in her room by herself, but the instant someone came to her door, she would stop on a dime. It was very different from the usual sort of crying, where a person takes a few minutes to slow down and stop (and is producing tears). And it was not related to any particular complaint (like saying she hurt somewhere or other).

I agree, it is very disconcerting. I hope you can find something that helps your mother.

Julianne


Wed Sep 12, 2012 2:37 pm
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Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 11:27 pm
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Post Re: Constant crying
Thanks, Julianne. I'll see what her doctor thinks about Lexapro.

Unlike your mom, even when I'm there, or someone else is, holding her hand and consoling her, she still cries. The caregivers have resorted to leaving her in bed in her room most of the day, as she's easier to manage, but the hospice nurse has urged the staff to get her up, dressed, and to meals, at the very least.

While Mom can not verbally communicate much any more, I know she knows who I am and that she can understand me. I've asked her if she wants have a priest visit her--thinking a spiritual conversation may console her---but she says no.

Fingers crossed, thanks for your advice,

Katie

P.S. Have your read "Caregiver's Guide to Lewy Body Dementia?" It's by Helen Buell Whitworth & James Whitworth (co-founder of the LBD Association). I found it to be an excellent resource that I keep going back to as the disease progresses.


Wed Sep 12, 2012 3:20 pm
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Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 1:46 pm
Posts: 3213
Location: WA
Post Re: Constant crying
One of the residents at my husband's SNF had the same behavior and it was successfully treated with some kind of medication. Of course, I don't know what it was but it's good to know something can be done about it. Not only is constant crying distressing for the patient and her family but for the other residents, as well.

_________________
Pat [68] married to Derek [84] for 38 years; husband dx PDD/LBD 2005, probably began 2002 or earlier; late stage and in a SNF as of January 2011. Hospitalized 11/2/2013 and discharged to home Hospice. Passed away at home on 11/9/2013.


Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:40 pm
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Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2010 5:46 pm
Posts: 610
Post Re: Constant crying
Katie,

Just to clarify, my mother could stop crying instantly, but often started up again and cried on and on. It was so sad to see this, regardless of the reason.

Another similarity, my mother, who has been very religious throughout her life, has lost interest in having a priest visit or go to the masses held in the nursing home. (She's Episcopalian, not Catholic, but for about a year, she was satisfied with the the Catholic priest and masses.) She can still speak but gives no explanation for this.

Anyway, good for the hospice staff for getting your mother up. Surely that is better than being in bed all day. I think sometimes the staff at the nursing home where my mother is will do whatever is most expedient rather than what is best. So far, it has always been minor things so I pick my battles, but there are times when advocacy is necessary.

Hope you and your doctor can find something to relieve your mother!

Julianne


Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:49 pm
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Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2010 9:33 pm
Posts: 3305
Location: Vermont
Post Re: Constant crying
Hi Katie - my dad went through bouts of crying that would last all day sometimes. I didn't experience this when I was with him, but some of his most favorite CGs would call me when this happened to see if I could think of anything that would help. I nearly tore out my hair when they'd call because I was so frustrated that NONE of us could do anything to help him. He was already on a lot of meds, including anti depressants and anti anxiety meds. He just had to cry himself to sleep before it stopped. About a week before he died he cried a lot when old friends that he'd known forever came by to see him and I was there with him all day. I wondered if having all these visitors was the best thing for him, but I felt that the tears had to do with him being so touched that people had made the effort to come to see him.
This is one of those really hard parts of the disease, knowing that no matter what you try, sometimes you just can't make it better for your LO. Just being there and trying to console them must help them some. Don't forget to take care of YOU too. Lynn

_________________
Lynn, daughter of 89 year old dad dx with possiblity of LBD, CBD, PSP, FTD, ALS, Vascular Dementia, AD, etc., died Nov. 30, 2010 after living in ALF for 18 months.


Tue Sep 18, 2012 9:09 pm
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