View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:41 pm



Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
 Ivermectin/Stromectol and LBD 
Author Message

Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 8:38 pm
Posts: 712
Location: CA
Post Ivermectin/Stromectol and LBD
Does anyone have any info or experience with an LBD patient taking ivermectin (stromectol)? It is typically used to treat scabies and other parasites. Interested in any effect on its own or in combination with the typical meds used by LBD patients. Thank you...

_________________
Renata (and Jerome-in-Heaven)


Mon Apr 30, 2007 11:45 pm
Profile
Post Re: Ivermectin/Stromectol and LBD
[quote="raffcons"]Does anyone have any info or experience with an LBD patient taking ivermectin (stromectol)? quote]

Hi! I never heard of it but I did look it up and here is what I found I hope it helps!



Ivermectin
Active Ingredients: Ivermectin
Representative Names: Stromectal


What are ivermectin tablets?
What should my health care professional know before I receive Ivermectin?
How should this medicine be used?
What if I miss a dose?
What drug(s) may interact with Ivermectin?
What side effects may I notice from receiving Ivermectin?
What should I watch for while taking Ivermectin?
Where can I keep my medicine?

What are ivermectin tablets? (Back to top)
IVERMECTIN (Stromectol®) treats parasite infections. This medicine treats worm infections like river blindness and a type of diarrhea called strongyloidiasis. It can also be used to treat other types of resistant parasitic infections, including scabies or head lice. Generic ivermectin tablets are not yet available.

What should my health care professional know before I receive Ivermectin? (Back to top)
They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
•asthma
•liver disease
•an unusual reaction to Ivermectin, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
•pregnant or trying to get pregnant
•breast-feeding

How should this medicine be used? (Back to top)
Take ivermectin tablets by mouth with a full glass of water. Do not take ivermectin with food. Follow the directions on the prescription label. As a general rule take ivermectin tablets 1 hour before breakfast. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Finish the full course of medicine prescribed by your prescriber or health care professional even if you feel better.

Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose? (Back to top)
Since ivermectin is usually given as a one time dose, it is unlikely that you will miss a dose. However, you may need a return visit to your doctor to see if you need repeat doses to cure the infection.

What drug(s) may interact with Ivermectin? (Back to top)
Ivermectin is usually given as a one time dose and thus drug interactions are thought to be uncommon. Check with your prescriber or health care professional if you will be receiving multiple doses of ivermectin and if you are taking other medications.

Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, or herbal products. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines.

What side effects may I notice from receiving Ivermectin? (Back to top)
Ivermectin is usually well tolerated and serious side effects are rare.

Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible:
•difficulty breathing
•eye or eyelid pain, irritation, redness or swelling
•loss or change of vision
•redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth
•skin rash, hives or increased itching
•yellowing of eyes or skin
•unusual weakness or tiredness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):
•dizziness or lightheadedness
•joint or muscle pain
•tender glands in the neck, armpits, or groin
•headache
•diarrhea
•loss of appetite
•nausea, vomiting
•tremors
•swelling of the face, hands, arms, feet, or legs

What should I watch for while taking Ivermectin? (Back to top)
Visit your prescriber or health care professional to check that your infection has gone. Your prescriber may request that you have stool samples or other tests checked for the infection. If you have a severe infection, you may need a repeat course of treatment.

You may get dizzy. Until you know how ivermectin affects you, do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness.

Practice good hygeine to prevent infection of others. Wash your hands, scrub your fingernails and shower often. Every day change and launder linens and undergarments. Scrub toilets often and keep floors clean.

Other people in your house may need treatment. Check with your prescriber or health care professional.


Tue May 01, 2007 7:47 pm

Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 8:38 pm
Posts: 712
Location: CA
Post 
What drug(s) may interact with Ivermectin? (Back to top)
Ivermectin is usually given as a one time dose and thus drug interactions are thought to be uncommon


That's my concern -- that ivermectin and DLB (and those meds) will create one of those uncommon reactions!

Are there any specialists to whom I can direct this question?

Many thanks, Irene!

_________________
Renata (and Jerome-in-Heaven)


Wed May 02, 2007 12:16 am
Profile
Post 
Ivermectin and many other antibiotics can often be taken without too much concern as it is better to treat the infection than to not treat it. Now that you are aware of the potential side effects, I would suggest that you simply remain as observant as you already are. Minor side effects that do not cause any distress should be noted. If there is any concern about an adverse event, then you should speak with your physician.

All medicines have side effects - most importantly is the need for observation to catch any potential problems early in order to nip them in the bud!

Hope this is helpful


Thu May 03, 2007 4:33 pm

Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 3:43 am
Posts: 215
Location: Seattle, WA
Post 
Ivermectin is metabolized by the liver on the 3A4 and 1A1 pathways; your pharmacist should be able to tell you if there's a potential for interaction with anything else your LO is using.

Eric

_________________
Cal is not the real name of a real 84 year old with DLB. I don't speak for LBDA, nor do I have clever initials behind my name, so information is provided without warranty. Caveat everybody. I blog at http://PragmaticCaregiver.blogspot.com


Fri May 04, 2007 4:17 am
Profile WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 5 posts ] 

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.
Localized by Maël Soucaze © 2010 phpBB.fr