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 Husband's hallucinations 
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Joined: Thu May 17, 2007 10:17 pm
Posts: 114
Post Husband's hallucinations
My husband has Parkinson's Plus with LBD. About three months ago he started talking about the "other" Mary. He believes there are two of me and can't understand why she is here. He hallucinates a lot about what she has done for him and can't figure out how he can have two wives. He has his lucid moments when he knows me and listens to me when I try to tell him the other one is me, also. He just can't figure it out. It is so frustrating to me since I can't explain it to satisfy him. He thinks he is in someone elses home that looks just like ours and wonders when we are going home. I told his neuro about this and they took Requip away from him thinking it would help. It has helped calm him threatening moods, but, he still thinks there are two of me. Has anyone else had this happen to them and how did they correct it, or is it something that can't be corrected?
maryangela


Sun Jun 03, 2007 7:34 pm
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Post Re: Husband's hallucinations
maryangela wrote:
He believes there are two of me and can't understand why she is here.


Hi MaryAngela,
This is a common complaint it is called "Capgrass" it is a delusion same thing as the "other home". you are trying to reason with a demented person where there is no reasoning with sometimes, I know it is frustrating but sometimes you need to just play along with it.

The Capgras delusion (or Capgras's syndrome) is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that an acquaintance, usually a spouse or other close family member, has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. The Capgras delusion is classed as a delusional misidentification syndrome, a class of delusional beliefs that involves the misidentification of people, places or objects. It can occur in acute, transient, or chronic forms.

The delusion is most common in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, although it can occur in a number of conditions including after brain injury and dementia.[1] Although the Capgras delusion is commonly called a syndrome, because it can occur as part of, or alongside, various other disorders and conditions, some researchers have argued that it should be considered as a symptom, rather than a syndrome or classification in its own right.


Sun Jun 03, 2007 8:24 pm

Joined: Thu May 17, 2007 10:17 pm
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Thanks, Irene, for your reply to my question. But, I want to know if this is ever corrected or do I have to assume this will be part of his behavior from now on. Is there any treatment for it?
thanks,
maryangela


Sun Jun 03, 2007 10:07 pm
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As to the correction that I really can't answer you for sure I do think the correct combination of meds can help, For us the capgras came and went!


Sun Jun 03, 2007 11:03 pm

Joined: Thu May 17, 2007 10:17 pm
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Thank you so much. This does give me hope.
maryangela


Sun Jun 03, 2007 11:35 pm
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Joined: Wed May 30, 2007 12:09 pm
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Maryangela wrote
[ He thinks he is in someone elses home that looks just like ours and wonders when we are going home.]


My mother also thinks that there are 2 of my daddy. An identical man posing as her husband. She often asks him " which one are you"? Asks who brought him there and why? Sometimes she even thinks there are 3 of him. She refers to him as "they".
Same with the home, thinking there is another house identical to the one she is in. She wants to go to "HER" house, can't understand why she is in the wrong house.
She thinks that someone gave us a script to follow to act all this out, or we're playing a joke on her.

Amazing that other's LOs have the same delusions.

#1daughter


Mon Jun 04, 2007 12:13 am
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My husband, also, thinks we are at the baseball stadium when we are watching the games on TV. He wonders how I got "such good seats". I, also, am amazed how they can get the same allusions or delusions. I guess this makes me feel somewhat better knowing other lo's are doing the same thing as he.
maryangela


Mon Jun 04, 2007 11:29 am
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Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 3:43 am
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Location: Seattle, WA
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There are effective drug therapies if the delusions are bothersome - we've had exceptional results from the use of psychostimulants - Provigil and dextroamphetamine. If you look at the top of the page there's a "search" link next to a tiny magnifying glass - search on "psychostimulants", "modafinil", "provigil" or "amphetamine" and you'll see various threads discussing our results and which experts are most experienced in using them.

Eric

(as an aside - the recurring delusion that we were having was both real estate and that Cal's son was the evil hired help that he'd fired several times).

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Cal is not the real name of a real 84 year old with DLB. I don't speak for LBDA, nor do I have clever initials behind my name, so information is provided without warranty. Caveat everybody. I blog at http://PragmaticCaregiver.blogspot.com


Mon Jun 04, 2007 4:33 pm
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It is now June 19 and Ronald (my husband) seems to be getting worse with his "capgrass". He is now speaking about a Mary #3 and possibly #4.
He is very angry most of the time when he speaks about them. He can't seem to remember me for very long at a time now. He is hallucunating about a lot of things now. He has always been a stubborn man, but, a kind man, too. He is now getting very abusive with his talk to me and he doesn't want me to even be around him some times. He has to allow me to help him, but, he resents it. Is this the normal progression of this? I am really getting to where I am a llittle frightened of him at times.
maryangela


Tue Jun 19, 2007 7:44 pm
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It almost seems you are writing about my mother with your last post.

Your husband's behavior to you is almost identical to my mother's behavior to my dad. She doesn't "like" him at all. Resents him being in the house with her. Needs his help but is angry and talks abusively to him.
Thinks there are 2 & 3 of him that sits down to a meal. She has bad problems with my dad. She can't remember living with him before this.
Mother thinks "they" are making or made a movie of his life, that none of this is real.

The things you write about seem all too familiar. It's so sad to see our Lo's this way.

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#1daughter

Caregiver to 84yr. mother w/LBD & 83yr. dad w/PD


Tue Jun 19, 2007 8:35 pm
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#1 Daughter: Did your mother ever get over this? It is so frustrating to me. He just seems to look at me without even knowing me. He will, occasionally, get to where he knows it is me, but, it doesn't last long.
Thank you for telling me this, I know now we aren't alone in this. I feel like I live with a stranger now. We have been married 45 years and it seems like I'm alone at times. I really cherish the few times we are "one" again.
maryangela


Tue Jun 19, 2007 9:46 pm
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Actually my mother is going through this now. From the very beginning, when we knew something was not right with her, it was dad she had most of the problems with. At first she was terrified of him, didn't want to be alone with him at all. Now she will stay with him, but doesn't trust him and thinks it is someone else who "switched' places with dad. She thinks 2 or 3 "dads" take turns being dad. She doesn't know they are married.

Dad has PD with many problems of his own. That makes it even harder.
It is all so strange. Seems so unreal.

Your husband is so much like what we experience with mother.
Believe me when I say " I feel your pain."

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#1daughter

Caregiver to 84yr. mother w/LBD & 83yr. dad w/PD


Wed Jun 20, 2007 12:30 am
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#1 daughter: I am so sorry you have your father with PD. Ronald has a lot of problems with his PD, also. The LBD is terrible, but, the PD has a lot of pain with it. He suffers from arthritis and the tremors get so bad he can hardly feed himself anymore. He has a lot of problems with swallowing and walking, also. I have him in a hospital bed in our bedroom. I can help him at night, if needed. I am the sole caregiver for him and, at times, it is reallydepressing. My finances are limited, so I cannot hire anyone to help me. I think the Medicare system and private insurances need to make provisions for this kind of help. We have always payed our way, but, it is allmost impossible to hire help at the cost of private care now days. Our children all have jobs so they are limited on time to help.
Thank you for your support and concern. It means a lot to me to know you count me as a friend.
maryangela


Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:51 pm
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Maryangela,
Do you get home health care for your husband? I understand it's a big help.

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#1daughter

Caregiver to 84yr. mother w/LBD & 83yr. dad w/PD


Wed Jun 20, 2007 10:19 pm
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 12:03 pm
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Dear MaryAngela and 1daughter-All the symptoms you describe account for PE's. It's been so difficult and now he has developed swallowing problems. But for a month now, he has a new treatment of Ebixa, or memantine which is working very well to bring back reasoning. He still has leg pain, gets tired easily, but the aggressive behavior and the "crazyness" especially in the morning have been almost eliminated. This makes regular life, like finishing his cereal at breakfast so much simpler to accomplish. I would hope you could ask your drs about memantine. Dinny Wolff


Wed Jun 20, 2007 11:18 pm
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