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 Behavior 
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Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2007 9:07 pm
Posts: 1
Post Behavior
I am new to this site. My father is diagnosed with DLB, aged 75. He is on several medications (serequel, klonipin, razadine (?), and Zyprexia to calm his agitation).

Question: He gets really angry sometimes and wants to "get out of the house"...he seems to go in and out of knowing who my mom is and calls my sister frequently to come pick him up. He even jumped out the window the other day after we had switched the locks on the house so he couldn't get out (single story home). I am concerned about how to deal with his anger and irritability. Any advise?


Mon Jan 15, 2007 11:04 pm
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Hi Lynnie,
Welcome to the LBD boards, I am glad you found us and I do know how hard this is for you, but them "wanting to get out of the house" is very common, they get to a stage in this illness that nothing makes sense to them, the very best I can advise is to calm him by redirecting other thoughts, trying to fight them on what they are doing is pointless, you will find he will calm easier than fighting him by saying no you can't go out.
Also please bare in mind if this is a new type of confusing there could be something else going on with him perhaps an infection , uti, these cause much confusion, no one seems to know why but they can turn someone up side down.
When my Husband became agitated and he did many many times I often took out photo albums, I would "ask" him to help me by cutting coupons out for me, sometimes just simply things help. :)
Good Luck come back often!


Tue Jan 16, 2007 11:50 am

Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2006 1:18 am
Posts: 53
Location: Chicago
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Dear Lynnie, I am sorry you and your family - essspecially you dad - are going through this. LBD has several core features, but they play out differently for many of our loved ones.

Is you dad's anger, etc. rather new? Or has this been going on since or before his diagnosis?

If it's older behavior, his medications may not be maximized. Ask his doctor or another good neulogist, gerontolgist, etc. to evaluate/re-evalute him.

When new symptoms like these appear, clinicians generally look at if and how the meds are working (too much of one, not enough of another, too many of one kind, drug interactions, etc.). Folks with LBD are extremely sensitive to meds - what works for six months may suddenly not work anymore.

They also look at the possibility of other kinds of problems - for example, infections such as UTIs, "silent" pneumonia, etc. can cause significant behavior changes. My mom becomes very paranoid and aggressive when she has a urinary tract infection. So have the MD rule out any physical illness or other previously-undiagnosed problem.

Does your dad actually get out of the house or his care facility? Of course he has dementia, but even those with LBD need a change. Can he be taken out with supervision? Beyon mild, non-dangerous behavioral problems, you will likely want to have the clinicians determine the cause and treatment.

I will keep you all in my prayers.

Peace, Lin


Wed Jan 17, 2007 2:05 am
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Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2006 4:38 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Evanston, IL
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Dad is in a nursing home and has bouts of wanting/needing to get out. The other day he was convinced the place was on fire and insisted Mom and my sister take him outside (he is wheelchair bound). Nothing would calm him until my sister had the brilliant idea to ask him to stay by the birds (they have an aviary in the common room) to make sure they were OK. Given this task he calmed down and, watching the birds, soon forgot about the fire.

My point in the story is perhaps there is something in the house that he cares about and wouldn't want to leave? Something or someone that needs his help or care? An activity that he is particularly fond of - special music, special books, antique furnitute that needs polishing - anything you can think of that is important to him?

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Diane
http://dianedidit.com


Wed Jan 24, 2007 11:16 pm
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Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 1:03 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Wisconsin
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To Anyone,
I am confused! I went to the nursing home yesterday to take my husband to lunch. We had gift certs. for a little place where our grand daughter works. When I got to the home, I told him to put on his coat that we were going out. He immediately started taking his shirt off. I went and got his coat and put it on him and zipped it for him. We started out and one of the nurses came running with his belt to keep his pants up. We got outside and I missed him, he was trying to get into a different colored car. I got his attention and he came close to the car. I said for him to get in. He said "How do I do that?" All of this is understandable with LBD.
My confusion comes when we got to the restaurant, he saw the grand daughter and he started talking to her like a normal healthy person. Of course it was short lived until he started talking like a LBD patient. How does he not know how to get into a car, but can carry on a normal conversation with our grand daughter, even a short one. This seems to happen so very often, especially with my sons, they both say, "He was 'with it' when I went to see him. It is confusing to me how he can do this. Does anyone else have this same type experience with their patients?? Thanks, Elaine

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Husband 78, In Late Stages of LBD


Sun Jan 28, 2007 10:53 am
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Joined: Fri Jan 26, 2007 2:29 pm
Posts: 57
Location: Wake Forest, NC
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My mother in -law just yeaterday got a phone call from her sister who she had not heard from in 6 months. we tried to explain to her that JAckie may not talk of just hand the phone back to us. JAckie stopped talking a couple of weeks ago we have a hard time getting her to say anything to us. (her son,me(daughter in law, and my mom) well Jackie gets on the phone and has this nice conversation with her sister for about 8 minutes. I sat there looking at her in amazment. My mom and I thought it had something to do with old memories. New short term memory not so good but old memory seems to stay with JAckie.


Sun Jan 28, 2007 11:16 am
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Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 1:03 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Wisconsin
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Hi Phillis, That sounds so very familiar!!! I think you are right about the old memories helping her to carry on a conversation. In my case, my husband doesn't even have the old memories anymore, that is why I am puzzled how it seems that he can pull it together at times when it isn't me that he is talking to, or not talking. The leader of the Caregiver meeting that I attend, once a month, was telling us a story that she, and only she believes, that when a patient is hanging on near death, that they can somehow wait until that last loved one gets there before they let go. She said that she has seen it happen over and over. Maybe this hanging on and carrying on a conversation, is the last thing that a LBD patient has to show that he isn't gone (in mind) and for the same unknown reason can do it. Whatever the answer is, it makes it hard for the outsider to understand that I can't talk sensibly to him.
Thanks for the input, again it sounds so familiar,
Elaine

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Husband 78, In Late Stages of LBD


Sun Jan 28, 2007 5:30 pm
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Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2006 4:38 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Evanston, IL
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It's the nature of the LBD/Alzheimer's beast, Elaine. I've read medical info that explains what physically happens in our LO's brains, but I couldn't repeat it to save my life. Besides, it's not all that convincing anyway . . . there are unexplained things, like how they can pull it together for a doctor's visit or how they can face the police with equanamity and claim that you are some stranger who is trying to kidnap them.

The long and short of it, is that I've given up trying to figure out why or when something like that will happen. I just take it as a little blessing amidst the horror of living with the disease. I'll take my hugs and love where I can get them - heaven knows there are more than enough bad times to deal with - I don't question the little miracles.
Best, Diane

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Diane
http://dianedidit.com


Sun Jan 28, 2007 6:08 pm
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Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 1:03 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Wisconsin
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Thanks Diane, for your words of wisdom!! You are so right, I am puzzled by it but I too take it as a small piece of the real person, and treasure it. To hear that it happens to other patients, helps to understand that it is a "normal Happening" to a LBD patient. It seems that all are somewhat alike in what the disease does to them. I miss him terribly, as do all of you.
Thanks again,
Elaine

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Husband 78, In Late Stages of LBD


Sun Jan 28, 2007 8:03 pm
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Hi ,
That ladies is what is called "Show Time"
it is very common with dementias.


Sun Jan 28, 2007 10:34 pm

Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 1:03 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Wisconsin
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Hi Irene,
Thanks for the reply. I guess I have a lot to learn in the near future. I have heard of "sundowning" but not "show time" it is such an apt name. These are the little things that I wish so much that my sons could see, hear, and understand. Did you experience this with your husband?
Thanks Again,
Elaine

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Husband 78, In Late Stages of LBD


Mon Jan 29, 2007 9:19 am
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Hi Elaine,
Very much so! For a very long time I imagine my children thought I was the crazy one, I would tell them of the happenings and when they came for a visit every so often they only seen a man that was obviously sick but not the things I would describe and then the day came when Jim could no longer jump into different hats and all could see!


Tue Jan 30, 2007 11:14 pm

Joined: Fri Jan 26, 2007 2:29 pm
Posts: 57
Location: Wake Forest, NC
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atilla,
you said your husband has early dementia. could you explain what you are expirencing . I am not sure where my mother in law stands with her dementia.

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Phyllis
taking care of Jackie 74 years old mother -in-law


Wed Jan 31, 2007 3:29 pm
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