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 Nigella sativa Linn. seed PubMed articles protects neurons 
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Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 8:35 pm
Posts: 51
Location: Toronto, Canada
Post Nigella sativa Linn. seed PubMed articles protects neurons
I found these recently on PubMed - research looks promising. Supplement can be found in some health food stores, but not all.

Thymoquinone protects cultured hippocampal and human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived neurons against α-synuclein-induced synapse damage..
Alhebshi AH, Odawara A, Gotoh M, Suzuki I
Source: Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Bionics, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji, Tokyo 19 2-0982, Japan.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24080376

The effect of Nigella sativa Linn. seed on memory, attention and cognition in healthy human volunteers.
Bin Sayeed MS, Asaduzzaman M, Morshed H, Hossain MM, Kadir MF, Rahman MR.
Source: J Ethnopharmacol. 2013 Jul 30;148(3):780-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2013.05.004. Epub 2013 May 21
PMID: 23707331 [PubMed - in process]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23707331

Thymoquinone protects cultured rat primary neurons against amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity.
Alhebshi AH, Gotoh M, Suzuki I.
Source: Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Bionics, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1Katakura, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0982, Japan.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23537659

There are many forms of "black seed oil" so it would be prudent to get something very similar (Nigella sativa Linn. seed oil) as to what was used in the research. There are some online health food companies that seem to sell it, but what to choose. I haven't tried it myself yet, but looking for something that might my siblings and I (mom's offspring), as her younger brother is now suffering from LBD (he is only two years younger than she) and diagnosed a year after she was. It doesn't look good for our family. No genetic testing yet; and, we're not sure we want to know! Dad's family was not affected, that's a plus, hopefully!

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Dale
[My dear, Mom, Beatrice, (born in 1929) was diagnosed with LBD in Dec 2006. She passed away peacefully on July 12, 2013 at Embassy Hall, Shannex, Quispamsis, N.B.]


Sat Oct 19, 2013 6:15 pm
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Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 247
Post Re: Nigella sativa Linn. seed PubMed articles protects neuro
I would take all of these articles with a healthy dose of skepticism.

The two cell culture ones are by the same lab, and cell culture is a very long way from useful clinical activity in humans. And the one study in humans was in healthy people, and the quality of the study is uncertain (carried out in Bangladesh, not sure what their human subjects protocols are like, and the journal is a minor journal, not a top-tier clinical journal that does solid peer review of clinical trials.)

Sorry to be discouraging, but I just see a ton of such ideas in my professional life, and very few of them have much scientific merit, and even among those that do, very few pan out when rigorously tested. That's why we only have 5 approved drugs for AD; not for lack of trying, believe me!

Laurel

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Laurel - mother (97) diagnosed April, 2011, with LBD; died May, 2014.


Mon Oct 21, 2013 12:19 am
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Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 8:35 pm
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Location: Toronto, Canada
Post Re: Nigella sativa Linn. seed PubMed articles protects neuro
That is disappointing, but I appreciate your professional feedback. Thanks very much.

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Dale
[My dear, Mom, Beatrice, (born in 1929) was diagnosed with LBD in Dec 2006. She passed away peacefully on July 12, 2013 at Embassy Hall, Shannex, Quispamsis, N.B.]


Mon Oct 21, 2013 2:35 am
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Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2011 9:07 pm
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Post Re: Nigella sativa Linn. seed PubMed articles protects neuro
There are a few things you can do, with good evidence that they help protect against brain damage - at least delay onset if not prevent altogether.
1. Starting as young as you can, keep an eye on your blood pressure, and treat any signs of hypertension (high blood pressure) aggressively. Use anti-hypertensives if you can't control it with sensible diet and exercise strategies.
Why? Hypertension damages the blood vessels, including those in the brain ("vascular damage"). This can create the conditions for other damage to your brain that can lead to dementia, such as the amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's. The damage from hypertension can start many years before the onset of dementia, but if you treat successfully and keep your blood pressure normal over those years, the risk looks essentially like that of someone who did not have hypertension.
2. Avoid risk factors for Type II diabetes (obesity, metabolic syndrome stuff.) Diabetes can cause vascular damage, and some newer research has identified other metabolic pathways that we believe cause brain damage. You know the story - eat healthy, have your doctor check your fasting blood sugar and take steps if you look "pre-diabetic" to improve your diet and exercise.
3. Stay physically active. There's some evidence that this helps reduce the risk.
4. Don't smoke. If you do smoke, quit. Now. (It's a vascular damage risk factor, again.)

Yes, people who have done all the right things still get dementia - but they may be getting it much later than would have happened otherwise!
And you'll also be reducing your risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, and so on.

(I personally want to see a study saying that ice cream reduces risk, but so far, no luck...)

Laurel

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Laurel - mother (97) diagnosed April, 2011, with LBD; died May, 2014.


Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:58 pm
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Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 8:35 pm
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Location: Toronto, Canada
Post Re: Nigella sativa Linn. seed PubMed articles protects neuro
Thanks, Laurel, for your information. I am aware of those risk factors. I have actually been diagnosed with diabetes type II (was gestationally diabetic during my last pregnancy 18 years ago). My blood sugar levels are pretty well controlled on Janumet 50/1000 mg b.i.d. and I am on an anti-hypertensive med. I had my GP do a psychological screening for cognitive impairment, but she stated jokingly that I likely did better than she would have done. She was just probably trying to reassure me for the time being. I am still working fulltime and walk at least 30 mins every weekday and often on weekends. I know I should be doing more exercise, so I'll have to commit to that. I am trying to follow Dr. Furman's nutritional guidelines eating more vegies/fruit and less carbs and staying away from processed foods. I do notice a difference with good lifestyle habits. It's scary nonetheless. I'm probably one of the few people alive who would welcome a cancer diagnosis down the road, rather than a dementia dx.

Poor mom didn't deserve what she went through. She had excellent vitals and no serious illness all throughout her life, very tall slim build, smart though not well educated, grew her own garden and ate fresh vegies often. She neither drank alcohol, nor smoked. I cannot think of any lifestyle vices to attribute to her. She'd been tested for diabetes, even had the OGTT but she was fine. She did have hypothyroidism around the time of diagnosis and noted low levels of B12 and high K, but that was it. To think her super, smart brother (retired, but former high-level management at a national company) is now afflicted with LBD is so shocking. It's nice to still be working with less time to dwell on my fear.

_________________
Dale
[My dear, Mom, Beatrice, (born in 1929) was diagnosed with LBD in Dec 2006. She passed away peacefully on July 12, 2013 at Embassy Hall, Shannex, Quispamsis, N.B.]


Wed Oct 23, 2013 2:51 am
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Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2011 9:07 pm
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Post Re: Nigella sativa Linn. seed PubMed articles protects neuro
Hi Dale,
Sounds like you are doing a good job of managing your health in between many other things in life - it's not easy! (I work 7 days a week, spend several hours after work with my parents every day, and try to help my daughter with her kids as time permits - know about the feeling that there are just not enough hours in the day.)

No one deserves this horrible illness - my mom, like yours, led a healthy life and was a good, kind person. Of course she was healthy until after she turned 94, so she did have a long healthy life, just kept going a little too long. My dad at 97 is still pretty much cognitively intact. I wish we knew more about how to prevent dementia. Working hard on it...

Hang in there, and I hope you are enjoying each day - and with luck, in a few years we will be able to stop LBD cold.
Laurel

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Laurel - mother (97) diagnosed April, 2011, with LBD; died May, 2014.


Sat Oct 26, 2013 12:58 am
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Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 8:35 pm
Posts: 51
Location: Toronto, Canada
Post Re: Nigella sativa Linn. seed PubMed articles protects neuro
Laurel, you're an inspiration! Thanks for all you do to keep us informed and encouraged.

I've just ordered a paperback on Amazon by an American neurologist, Dr. Vincent Fortanasce, entitled "The Anti-Alzheimer's Prescription: The Science-Proven Prevention Plan to Start at Any Age". He promotes his "D-E-A-R" program consisting of a healthy Diet, Exercise (particularly isometric), Accentuation of cognitive function through puzzles, etc., and Relaxation (good sleep hygiene) to help me acquire better lifestyle habits. I figure if I study the advice and keep his book in a prominent position where I'll see it everyday, I'll be more motivated to stick to the rigor of self-discipline. Personally, I feel physical exercise may be the most crucial factor in preventing dementia. I see one of my mother's elder brothers (most physically active sibling in her family, always on the go, helping my brothers with construction/renovation projects, serving breakfasts at the Legion, etc., etc., his wife has Alzheimer's, so they shared similar nutrition), yet he remains cognitively intact and vivacious in his late 80's! He came from same gene pool as my mom, ate similar food in identical surroundings (largely produced on his own farm), yet he seems to have side-stepped dementia. He's a joy to behold, but then like your mom, it could just be a matter of time for him; however, he's managed to squeeze a lot of joy out of living longer and healthier than any of his siblings. Ironically, his son has Alzheimer's or LBD (early stage), so go figure, right? Of course, I realize gene expression can be homozygous and heterozygous, etc., still it's fascinating!

Take care,
d.

_________________
Dale
[My dear, Mom, Beatrice, (born in 1929) was diagnosed with LBD in Dec 2006. She passed away peacefully on July 12, 2013 at Embassy Hall, Shannex, Quispamsis, N.B.]


Sat Oct 26, 2013 12:10 pm
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