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 PD Research: Neurons destroyed by 3 simultaneous strikes 
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Post PD Research: Neurons destroyed by 3 simultaneous strikes
This press release on research into Parkinson's Disease was published today by Columbia University Medical Center. Some key excerpts:

* The study...showed that three molecules ­ the neurotransmitter dopamine, a calcium channel, and a protein called alpha-synuclein ­act together to kill the neurons.

* The studies found that neurons die because calcium channels lead to an increase of dopamine inside the cell; excess dopamine then reacts with alpha-synuclein to form inactive complexes; and then the complexes gum up the cell's ability to dispose of toxic waste that builds up in the cell over time. The waste eventually kills the cell.

* The neurons will survive if just one of the three factors is missing, Drs. Sulzer and Mosharov also found. "It may be possible to save neurons and stop Parkinson's disease by interfering with just one of the three factors," Dr. Mosharov says.

* That means that one drug already in clinical trials ­ which blocks the culprit calcium channel ­ may work to slow or stop the progression of the disease, an achievement none of the current treatments for Parkinson's disease can accomplish. [Robin's note: I'm not sure which trial medication is being referred to; perhaps isradipine. Isradipine is a medication given to control high blood pressure. Northwestern University published research about two years ago on isradipine slowing the progression of PD in a mouse model.]

* The new study shows that it's the location of the dopamine inside the neurons that determines its toxicity.

The press release is not yet available on the CUMC website. You can find it on EurekAlert! I read about it on a PSP-related online support group today. Here's a link to EurekAlert! and the full text of the press release:


http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 042309.php

Parkinson's: Neurons destroyed by 3 simultaneous strikes
New theory of Parkinson's disease gives researchers fresh ideas for treatments
Columbia University Medical Center Press Release
4/29/09

NEW YORK ­ In a study that reveals the clearest picture to date of neuron death in Parkinson's disease, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have found that a trio of culprits acting in concert is responsible for killing the brain cells.

The study, published in the April 30 issue of Neuron, showed that three molecules ­ the neurotransmitter dopamine, a calcium channel, and a protein called alpha-synuclein ­ act together to kill the neurons.

The discovery gives researchers a new understanding of how to save the neurons, say the study's authors, Eugene Mosharov, Ph.D., associate research scientist, and David Sulzer, Ph.D., professor of neurology & psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center.

"Though the interactions among the three molecules are complex, the flip side is that we now see that there are many options available to rescue the cells," says Dr. Mosharov.

The symptoms of Parkinson's ­ including uncontrollable tremors and difficulty in moving arms and legs ­ are blamed on the loss of neurons from the substantia nigra region of the brain.

Researchers had previously suspected dopamine, alpha-synuclein and calcium channels were involved in killing the neurons, but could not pin the deaths on any single molecule.

The new paper, along with previous studies with Dr. Ana Maria Cuervo at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, shows that it is the combination of all three factors that kills the neurons.

The studies found that neurons die because calcium channels lead to an increase of dopamine inside the cell; excess dopamine then reacts with alpha-synuclein to form inactive complexes; and then the complexes gum up the cell's ability to dispose of toxic waste that builds up in the cell over time. The waste eventually kills the cell.

The neurons will survive if just one of the three factors is missing, Drs. Sulzer and Mosharov also found. "It may be possible to save neurons and stop Parkinson's disease by interfering with just one of the three factors," Dr. Mosharov says.

That means that one drug already in clinical trials ­ which blocks the culprit calcium channel ­ may work to slow or stop the progression of the disease, an achievement none of the current treatments for Parkinson's disease can accomplish.

Good Dopamine; Bad Dopamine

The idea that dopamine contributes to the death of neurons may seem paradoxical, since most Parkinson's patients take L-DOPA to increase the amount of dopamine inside the cells.

The new study shows that it's the location of the dopamine inside the neurons that determines its toxicity.

Most of dopamine inside the neurons is packaged into compartments that are shipped to the edge of the cell where the dopamine is released. The motor symptoms of Parkinson's arise when the amount of dopamine released by the cells declines. L-DOPA improves symptoms by boosting the amount of dopamine released by the cells. As long as dopamine is confined inside the compartments before it is released, it is safe.

Outside the compartments in the cell's cytoplasm, however, Drs. Sulzer and Mosharov found that dopamine - in concert with calcium and alpha-synuclein ­ is toxic.

New Idea for Treatment

A better treatment, the researchers say, may be to push more dopamine into the compartments where it has no toxic effect on the cell.

"That would be a magic treatment," Dr. Mosharov says. "Not only would it stop cells from dying and the disease from progressing, it would improve the patient's symptoms at the same time by giving their neurons more dopamine to release."

Drs. Sulzer and Mosharov are currently working on genetic therapies that could accomplish this feat, but caution that it will be years before any such treatment is ready for clinical trials, if ever.

###

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508

Columbia University Medical Center provides international leadership in basic, pre-clinical and clinical research, in medical and health sciences education, and in patient care. The Medical Center trains future leaders and includes the dedicated work of many physicians, scientists, public health professionals, dentists, and nurses at the College of Physicians & Surgeons, the Mailman School of Public Health, the College of Dental Medicine, the School of Nursing, the biomedical departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and allied research centers and institutions. Established in 1767, Columbia's College of Physicians and Surgeons was the first institution in the country to grant the M.D. degree and is now among the most selective medical schools in the country. Columbia University Medical Center is home to the most comprehensive medical research enterprise in New York City and state and one of the largest in the United States and is affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. For more information, please visit www.cumc.columbia.edu.


Wed Apr 29, 2009 10:46 pm
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