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 Ideal house layout 
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Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 8:38 pm
Posts: 712
Location: CA
Post Ideal house layout
I'm presently houseshopping and want to find the most Lewy-friendly layout possible. Anything you wish you could change about your house that would make life easier for you or your LO?

I already realize that one-story is probably best. And I know that the master bedroom and bathroom should be spacious enough to comfortably accommodate an aide and any equipment we might need (e.g. a lift). A large walk-in shower that could accommodate a bathing bench makes most sense for us.

Do most LOs end up using a wheelchair, or does the progression seem to be from walker to mostly bed rest? Should I make sure the house is handicapped accessible throughout?

What would be on your wish (or "wish I could do it over") list? Thanks!

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Renata (and Jerome-in-Heaven)


Sat Aug 16, 2008 4:31 am
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Renata,
We moved just 4 weeks before Jim's passing but the move was for him and his medical needs, I always had a home with seperate Living room and dining room we opted for a home that had a very large great room with our master bedroom right off it and the bath room was straight in, if he had lived longer I probably would have had the bath room doorway enlarged, I was able to get the chair we had in there but wasn't much room for me to get around to the front of it, of course it had a walk in shower and was all on one floor. The reason I picked a great room style home was that way he could see me at almost all times or be within ear shot, the kitchen and great room were like one large room, and those were the rooms we were in most of the day, When I would lay him down for a nap his hospital bed was arranged so he see right out the door way, there were large windowns in the bedroom and he was able to see all the birds outside. My huband had bee in a wheel chair for about 18 months, I used a transport chair in the house they are a tad bit smaller and manuever better in the house I think. I kept the regular chair in the truck of the car and when we needed to go away for an appointment or whatever I would get him out to the car with the transfer chair and just use the larger chair in the trunk we we got where we were going.


Sat Aug 16, 2008 7:46 am

Joined: Sat Sep 22, 2007 5:53 pm
Posts: 90
Location: Texas
Post 
My husband is probably in a wheelchair over 50% of the time. A ramp into the house. Those small steps are hard to get a wheelchair over and the transport chair is even harder. Our son just built a house and I can't even get the small transport wheelchair in the guest bathroom door. Then in their master bath again a door for the toilet. Does not work when he is in the wheelchair. Thick carpeting makes it harder to push the wheelchair. I keep the transport chair in car and wheelchair in the house. This is crucial - no sloping driveways. Now all of this is assuming that your husband may eventually need a wheelchair. Handicap grab bars in the shower and on both sides of toilet. I was in a hospital bathroom yesterday and I think they had grab bars on three sides around the toilet. I may have to add more as they come to me.
Lorraine


Sat Aug 16, 2008 2:29 pm
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Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 8:38 pm
Posts: 712
Location: CA
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I can't thank each of you enough for passing on those tips. Keep them coming!

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Renata (and Jerome-in-Heaven)


Sat Aug 16, 2008 4:04 pm
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Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:05 am
Posts: 150
Location: Raleigh, NC
Post fall mats?
What a great list of tips you all have come up with. I wish I had foreseen all of this when I moved my mother in with me. Now that she's in a dementia unit, I have another similar question.

She cannot walk on her own but she keeps trying. She has had a few falls, with the most recent resulting in a broken hip. During her convalescence, we have 24-hour nursing aids with her but we can't keep that up forever. So what do we do to prevent falls, or lessen their damage?

We're most concerned about the possibility she'll try to get out of bed at night, which is how she broke her hip. She is already in a high-low bed, set on low when she's sleeping, with a scooped mattress to discourage exiting. That obviously didn't work. I do plan to get a bed alarm, but that only announces she's on the move. A fall pad would soften the fall, but it seems likely to make the fall even more probable. The facility considers bed rails a restraint and doesn't allow them, nor do other facilities I've checked with.

Has anyone found a good solution? If a fall pad is a good idea, what's the best thickness and size?


Mon Aug 18, 2008 5:33 pm
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 4811
Location: SF Bay Area (Northern CA)
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garnetb has started a new topic for her questions here:
http://www.lewybodydementia.org/forum/v ... php?t=1020


Mon Aug 18, 2008 5:45 pm
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 4811
Location: SF Bay Area (Northern CA)
Post 
Renata,

You might check out this thread:
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/eve/forums ... 3871037591

Some interesting ideas (from that AD Forum thread) come up such as individual room-controlled AC/heating system. LBDers often don't sweat so it's nice if their bedroom can be one temp while the room where the caregiver is can be another temp.

Robin


Mon Aug 18, 2008 10:27 pm
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Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 12:25 pm
Posts: 20
Post 
I have read all the very helpful tips but I have one problem with my husband now he is getting more ridgid and is harde to move on the bed for changing I have to manually push him to get his diapers under him it is getting very hard for me I am 75 years old .Any suggestions? Is there some kind of utility to help with this?


Tue Sep 23, 2008 9:42 am
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 4811
Location: SF Bay Area (Northern CA)
Post 
There are several books on the subject of caregiving tips for taking care of bed-bound people, including how to change incontinence briefs or how to bathe someone who is in bed. The Red Cross publishes a good one.

Do you have hired help? Do you have hospice?


Wed Sep 24, 2008 1:16 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 7:46 pm
Posts: 2
Post Great new topic
I think this is a great new topic area for those of us who are moving into real hands-on caregiving... Thanks! I've learned a lot and as I learn some things, I'll post.


Tue Oct 07, 2008 9:59 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 7:46 pm
Posts: 2
Post 
Actually, the last was from Judy... not my hubby Roy I'm hoping to get him to sign on to the patient site where Irene is moderating. I'll admit, I set it up for him on that site. I don't know whether he will really post on it.Today as we were driving to our gym, he asked to set up some time to read more about Louie Dobie. I thought he was referring to some lawyer in his old corporation. He was so angry with me when I tried to discern whether this was someone who wanted him to report to work training wrestlers (never did anything like that, but woke up in the morning with that on his agenda) or whether it was another old boss who asked him to take the spot on the ticket for Joe Biden (our local guy) because he had a death in the family. (Jill's mom) ... until I realized that he wanted to read about delusions in Lewy Body disease! Get it? Louie Dobie... Lewy Body.
Have to admit I didn't get it at first.. so I was accused of "playing games" with him. Maybe, I could just print him out some selections from our site.
Judy


Tue Oct 07, 2008 10:13 pm
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Judy,
I hope that Roy does post , I think it will be helpful to speak with others that are going through similar things. I don't interact with the people unless I am asked a question, it is their area.
I know how frustrating it can be with trying to understand when they are trying to make a point and we the caregiver have to do the guessing.


Tue Oct 07, 2008 10:58 pm

Joined: Sat Sep 23, 2006 1:12 pm
Posts: 23
Post Turning someone and home tips
I think it is best to have no carpeting whatsoever. Once you reach the stage of using a hoyer, which has to move while holding up a lot of weight, it is virtually impossible to push it over any sort of carpeting.
If the person is still walking, then arrange some furniture always nearby for the person to grab.
Yes, check the width of your bathroom door. They do make narrow tranpsort chairs, that fit thru these doors. We have a chair just for this purpose.
As for the person who asked about changing her husband: Can you get help? That would be the most obvious solution, given age issues. It's not going to get any easier, but when turning him, bend his knees so that you can push him over at the shoulder and hips.


Fri Nov 14, 2008 10:31 am
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Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 12:54 pm
Posts: 115
Post 
Dear Mary,

I know this sounds weird, but I found a lot of information about hands on caregiving and patient care on YOU TUBE. They have videos on there about patient care by medical professionals. I learned how to transport my loved one from chair to wheelchair, wheelchair to bed. I found out how to roll the patient correctly so as not to hurt me or my loved one. There are videos on how to operate a hoyer lift, how to lift a patient, and even how to wash their hair while they are laying in bed. I think it is under patient care, but I'll have to look it back up and let you know the exact topic. I hope this helps.

Joyce K


Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:49 am
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Joined: Sat Sep 23, 2006 1:12 pm
Posts: 23
Post Hoyer lift video on Youtube
Yeah there are good tips but you also have to be careful. Some of the Hoyer lift advice was not correct and could result in the lift tipping...so read the manual too.
Also, on a lighter note, when I searched for diapering adults on youtube I got a lot of VERY STRANGE links. I had to laugh, it certainly wasn't what I had in mind.


Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:54 am
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