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 How do you move someone? 
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Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2011 1:11 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Michigan
Post How do you move someone?
My husband hasn't been able to walk since last year, but he could stand long enough with my help or a walker to pivot into bed/wheelchair/etc. He's now losing even that ability, and I'm trying to figure out what to do. He's fallen a couple of times in the past two weeks, and I've had to call for help. Any suggestions? Do lifts work?

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Wife of a 60-year-old LBD patient who was diagnosed in 2003.


Sun Jun 05, 2011 9:14 pm
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Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 1:46 pm
Posts: 3213
Location: WA
Post Re: How do you move someone?
Lifts work but I don't think they would pick him up off the floor. The aides and I use sit-to-stand and Hoyer lifts at the SNF and they work great to transfer.

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Pat [68] married to Derek [84] for 38 years; husband dx PDD/LBD 2005, probably began 2002 or earlier; late stage and in a SNF as of January 2011. Hospitalized 11/2/2013 and discharged to home Hospice. Passed away at home on 11/9/2013.


Sun Jun 05, 2011 9:54 pm
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Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2010 9:33 pm
Posts: 3430
Location: Vermont
Post Re: How do you move someone?
Hi - I'm sorry this is happening, and know how scary it is for both of you. There are several other postings about falls on here. If you haven't done so already, this would be a good time to start checking out facilities and get some help (or more help) at home in the meantime. Mobility becomes less and less and falls more and more often. Unless you are an incredibly physically strong person, picking up a person from the floor, especially when they are no longer to help you help them, you will need more help.

When my dad's falls became more frequent, he also became temporarily paralyzed. He could not help anyone help him off the floor. Arms and legs were totally useless and he was confused and delusional. Then he'd go back to somewhat near "normal" for a while, but never got back to the physical or mental levels at which he'd been. Each fall marked an overall decline, which is why planning for future care & living arrangements becomes so important.

I wish you much luck and am sending a big hug. You have lots of people here who have been there, done that and want to help support you in this very difficult journey. Lynn

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Lynn, daughter of 89 year old dad dx with possiblity of LBD, CBD, PSP, FTD, ALS, Vascular Dementia, AD, etc., died Nov. 30, 2010 after living in ALF for 18 months.


Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:43 am
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Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 1:46 pm
Posts: 3213
Location: WA
Post Re: How do you move someone?
Quote:
When my dad's falls became more frequent, he also became temporarily paralyzed. He could not help anyone help him off the floor. Arms and legs were totally useless

That's exactly how Derek is when he falls. And when he fell at home he'd get angry at me because I couldn't just pick him up! :cry:

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Pat [68] married to Derek [84] for 38 years; husband dx PDD/LBD 2005, probably began 2002 or earlier; late stage and in a SNF as of January 2011. Hospitalized 11/2/2013 and discharged to home Hospice. Passed away at home on 11/9/2013.


Mon Jun 06, 2011 8:11 am
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Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2009 2:28 pm
Posts: 464
Location: Minnesota
Post Re: How do you move someone?
Debry, if you don't mind my asking, how old are you? What is your physical and mental condition?

I have learned the hard way that these things are at least equally important when making that horribly difficult decision about long term care. How much good are you going to do your husband when you are in a back brace? Or worse, have had back surgery? And that's only one of the stresses we willingly endure for the sake of our loved ones. Yet, we all know that they would never have asked us to ruin our own health just to keep them at home.

As I said in another post, no one wants to give up caring for someone they love in a setting that gives them both comfort. But the reality is that there often comes a time when we have to, for both of our sakes. What if you drop him when you can't hold him up anymore? Believe me. I know how tough this decision is, but I wish I had said "enough" a lot earlier. It took a hospital stay for Mom before I admitted that I couldn't do it anymore.

Take a reality check. How much longer can you handle this physically? LTC facilities, particularly the good ones, have long waiting lists. If your husband should end up in the hospital, a social worker might persuade a facility to move him up on the list, but that's a gamble. And recognize that his health and comfort depends, at least partially, on you maintaining your health and strength. And this will continue, even after he moves into LTC.

So, along with looking for ways to get your husband up off the floor, start thinking about, and working on, using professionals for the heavy lifting. You still need ways to pick him up, because LTC won't happen overnight. But get started on taking care of both of you - not just your husband.

And good for you for calling for help. Keep on doing it!

Best wishes,

Kate

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Kate [i](Cared for Mom for years before anyone else noticed the symptoms, but the last year of her life was rough and we needed to place her in an SNF, where she passed in February 2012)[/i]


Mon Jun 06, 2011 1:35 pm
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Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 2:59 pm
Posts: 1978
Post Re: How do you move someone?
I agree with Kate on some of these points, when dealing with many people on the help line they often ask when is it time for placement and really so much depends on the caregiver and how much that person can endure , often couples are close in age and size , often health is an issue for a caregiver, in my case I was 14 yrs younger and at the time was in fairly good health but I can tell you my body suffered for all the lifting , pulling, pushing I had to do or should I say choose to do because in my mind no one could do it as well as I could, I think the question all caregivers have to ask themselves is: Is my loved one getting the care he/she deserves and needs and I believe just with that question the answers come ! When they get to the point of the caregiver not being able to transfer they have to have more help either come to the home or placement needs to be done !
Just my .02 worth!

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Irene Selak


Mon Jun 06, 2011 8:58 pm
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Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2011 1:11 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Michigan
Post Re: How do you move someone?
Thanks Everyone. I do have Bob on a waiting list at one facility and I need to get him on some others. We're only in our 50s, but I have medical problems of my own that limit what I can do. I have some husky nephews out of college for the summer. Maybe I'll pay them to help me get him up in the morning and in bed at night. I also have a call in to the doctor requesting some in-home physical therapy. Can't hurt.

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Wife of a 60-year-old LBD patient who was diagnosed in 2003.


Mon Jun 06, 2011 9:36 pm
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Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2010 9:33 pm
Posts: 3430
Location: Vermont
Post Re: How do you move someone?
Sound like good ideas, Debry. You do need to take care of you! Some here have relied on neighbors, firemen or EMTs to help get their LOs off the floor, but that can only last for so long. When the falls get more frequent (and they will) you'll need a longer-term plan. Just like raising little kids, you do your best to keep them safe but inevitably they fall or get hurt in other ways. Getting in home help and planning for LTC is about as much as you can do for both of you now. I wish you the best, Lynn

_________________
Lynn, daughter of 89 year old dad dx with possiblity of LBD, CBD, PSP, FTD, ALS, Vascular Dementia, AD, etc., died Nov. 30, 2010 after living in ALF for 18 months.


Mon Jun 06, 2011 9:58 pm
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Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 2:59 pm
Posts: 1978
Post Re: How do you move someone?
This is an articule I came across that Robin must have forwarded to the support groups and I found it very fitting here with the subject:

This email is about family caregivers neglecting their own health.

Local support group member Maureen forwarded me this article on a new study that showed that 45% of family caregivers "are more likely to neglect their own prescription medications than they are to neglect medication for the person for whom they are caring." The lead author of the study said: "Caregivers appear to be so focused on helping family members that they often forget to take care of themselves, behavior that can have severe consequences for their health and well-being."

"The authors of the study said they hope to raise awareness among medical professionals that caregivers, as a population, may require added support to more actively manage their own health."

Here's the full article.



Study finds caregivers aren't following their own prescriptions
Healthcare Finance News
May 26, 2011

BOSTON – A new study by researchers at Harvard University, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and CVS Caremark has found that 45 percent of people who provide care to a family member are more likely to neglect their own prescription medications than they are to neglect medication for the person for whom they are caring.

More than 65 million people in this country describe themselves as a caregiver to a close family member.

The study, published online this week in the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, found that caregiver non-adherence to medication regimens is especially likely if cost is an issue.

"Our findings indicate care-giving status may be an important characteristic for providers to identify and that caregivers may represent a fertile target for adherence interventions to improve chronic disease management and prevent chronic disease," the study authors concluded.

The report is the latest product of a three-year collaboration between Harvard, Brigham and Women’s and CVS Caremark to research pharmacy claims data as a means to better understand patient behavior, particularly on issues of medication adherence. For this most recent study, researchers conducted an online survey of 2,000 retail pharmacy customers, of which 38 percent, or 762 respondents, described themselves as caregivers.

Key findings of from the caregiver group included:

* 45 percent said they somewhat or strongly agree that they are more likely to forget to take their own medications even though they provide family members with their medicine.

* 46 percent said caring for their family is more important than caring for themselves and 52 percent said they are more likely to sacrifice their own health to make sure they properly care for family members.

* 53 percent reported that managing their personal health and caring for another is stressful and that they eat to cope with that stress.

Further, when comparing caregivers with non-caregivers, caregivers said they are 10 percent more likely to forget taking their medicines, 11 percent are likely to stop taking their medications if they feel better and 13 percent said they are likely to forget refills.

"We found there is a compelling relationship between caregiving and medication adherence," said William Shrank, MD, MSHS, of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, the lead author of the study. "Caregivers appear to be so focused on helping family members that they often forget to take care of themselves, behavior that can have severe consequences for their health and well-being."

The authors of the study said they hope to raise awareness among medical professionals that caregivers, as a population, may require added support to more actively manage their own health.

"These results highlight an important opportunity for our industry to work with a target population to increase adherence," said Troyen A. Brennan, executive vice president and chief medical officer of CVS Caremark and a co-author of the study. "Doctors need to identify caregivers so they can provide appropriate support. In addition, pharmacists are uniquely positioned to intervene and encourage caregivers to take their medicine because the caregiver is often the person who is picking up medications for both family members and themselves."

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Irene Selak


Tue Jun 07, 2011 11:09 am
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