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 New here in Columbus, Oh 
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Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2009 1:12 pm
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Post New here in Columbus, Oh
My mother-in-law has what we suspect is LBD. No tremors, sharp memory, and she was living alone, and extremely active, until age 94, when she fell (for an unknown reason) and broke her hip. Up until the fracture, her only maladies were declining eyesight due to macular degereration, and hearing loss, but she was 94 years of age, and we considered it normal. To be honest, we thought the fracture might be the end for her, with the poor prognosis of a broken hip at her age. Because she was so healthy she pulled through the hip fracture just fine and now walks reasonably well, except for the telltale gait stiffness (which is also an LBD symptom).

What should have been one of the first real indications of the suspected LBD (other than the unexplained fall) were the vivid hallucinations she was having during her 6 week stint in rehab for her hip. We suspected the hallucinations were due to pain meds, which we later found out she wasn't on at the time.

It is now one year later, and she has an imaginary attacker, who communicates with her through an electronic black box, and shoves jelly bean sized batteries up her rear end (fortunately only imaginary). She has demanded the cops be called to arrest him, but he can only be arrested in person at his house. She has delusions that he has put a million dollars in her bank account, and asks us the check it daily.

The anxiety caused by this "attacker" causes her BP to spike. One episode resulted in her being sent to an emergency room, which only wanted to treat the symptom, the BP. They told us they'd admit her to their psych floor, but later recanted, after holding her in their ER for 24 hours, and the they sent her to the Ohio Psyc Center.

The Psych Center held her for 10 days and put her on Excelon (patch), Seroquel, and Namenda. For two weeks she seemed to do better, but then her "attacker" showed up again.

In retrospect, we now realize that her imbalance was probably more than just old age. The first hallicinations we saw were probably not the first, and they weren't caused by pain meds.

No one is calling this LBD but us, but I'm not sure what else it could be. She has a good memory, and her heart and lungs are sound, and she has no urinary infections. She has had CAT scans and physically she is fine. She is angry we have put her in an assisted living center and she wants her old apartment back.

She is having more and more episodes with her "attacker." Her primary care pysician knows nothing whatsoever about the drugs Ohio Psych has asked him to prescribe, and doesn't want to learn; yet he also won't refer us to anyone that is familiar with them. We don't want to go back to the Ohio Psych Center every time she has an episode. When we ask the Ohio Psych Center what our next step should be, they tell us electroshock therapy. ELECTROSHOCK FOR A 95 YEAR OLD SUFFERING FROM DEMENTIA??? Is this standard protocol?

Can anyone recommend a doctor that specializes in LBD in the Columbus, Ohio area? My wife and I are at wits end, and we just want this woman who has been great to her (and us) to live out her days in relative peacefulness and tranquility.


Wed Dec 09, 2009 4:44 pm
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Location: SF Bay Area (Northern CA)
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Does she have dementia?


Wed Dec 09, 2009 4:59 pm
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Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2009 7:21 pm
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Location: Ohio
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Surely there is a neurologist or a neurology dept. at Ohio State University hospitals. And you don't need a referral from the family doctor unless something has radically changed. Also the Ohio Dept. on Aging should have some resources for you as should the local Alzeihmer's association. Keep searching this forum. There's a wealth of information here. Good luck. Dee


Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:25 pm
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Well, the "attacker" isn't real. She seems to have RBD, and she tells us she ripped up her bed trying to fight off her attacker. There is no million dollars in her bank account. She has a version of the Capgras syndrom or whatever, thinking one ring has been replaced by another. So, yes, if that isn't dementia I'd be hard pressed to know what else it could be. By process of elimination, and being otherwise healty and having a good memory, we suspect LB type, possibly around stage 2 1/2 from what I read here. Of course when she talks to her primary care physician, he sees little of this, and doesn't seem to care what we see and notice.

There was a time I thought old doctors were wise doctors--that was my own stupidity. The older I get the more I realize too many old doctors are lazy doctors, and many don't want to learn anymore. I'm to the point that many doctors MAKE me sick.


Last edited by mquillen on Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:32 pm
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Dee, I have checked with OSU, and after being transferred 4 times to dead end numbers I found out they do require a referral. We are working on that with our useless primary care physician. I thought perhaps someone on this board might know of a specific doctor in the Columbus vicinity they could recommend.


Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:35 pm
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Delusions are not the same thing as dementia. (Believing there's an attacker is a delusion, not a hallucination.) Just because someone has delusions doesn't mean they have LBD. (It's not even a required symptom!) Have you reviewed the LBD diagnostic criteria? Does she have any of the symptoms?

Does the geriatric psychiatrist say she has dementia?

Delusions are hard to treat. They may not go away entirely with Exelon, Namenda, and Seroquel.

To find an LBD specialist in Columbus, OH, I suggest you contact the APDA (American Parkinson Disease Association) Information & Referral Center Coordinator for the state of OH -- Debbie Mills, phone 937-903-0699. You can use my name (Robin Riddle). She's at Kettering and has many years of experience with PD and related disorders.


Wed Dec 09, 2009 8:46 pm
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There is a difference between dementia, delusions and hallucination. What you're are describing sound more like delusion. Dementia is diffecult thinking things out, planning, problem solving,etc. This is one of feature in LBD. There are several key feature a dx. Hope you find the help you need. Laurie


Wed Dec 09, 2009 9:32 pm
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Oh, sorry about the repeat info. I didn't see Robin's last entry, I was away from computer after I started my entry.


Wed Dec 09, 2009 9:37 pm
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mquillen: looks like Robin has provided a resourse that has a "name & phone #"......:) Oh the politics of a university medical center...... :( Which reminds me of something we've often discussed on these boards: the role of patient advocate that each care giver takes on. If we don't speak up, who will? And how well I share your feelings about how drs. only look at the person for the 15-30 minutes they see them which is in a very controlled environment. But finally our gero-psych has taken to discussing details of my DH's daily activities, motivations & feelings & he encourages me to add my 2cents, finally! In his profession, my husband was successful because he was a charming & likable guy & that aspect of his personality always blossoms with the drs., people at the bank & others that he interacts with on a very limited basis in a controlled environment. I wish you well in your role. Dee


Thu Dec 10, 2009 10:17 am
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Thanks for the help here. Robin and Laurie, with all due respect, delusions are also a sign of dementia, but yes, they don't have to be there. Regardless, there are enough other symptoms of dementia, (decreased organizational skills, inability to plan, poor attention span) to make it obvious that there is indeed dementia.

I brought up the hip fracture and her post operative delerium because there is strong evidence of a relationship between hip fracture and dementia, albeit it is unclear as to what that relationship really is. Your insights have made my wife and I more closely recall her mother's personality quirks, and we suspect there were signs of dementia prior to the hip fracture; we realize that what many think is normal aging, is not necessarily normal aging, whether we're talking about a 95 year old or a 75 year old.

To further compound the situation, she is very depressed and has gone through a grieving process due to the loss of her independence, and her apartment. Of course the depression can also cause dementia symptoms.

Also noted was her macular degeneration and her severe hearing loss. To some extent she is suffering from sensory deprivation, I suspect. She doesn't have the attention span to mess with a hearing aid got frustrated when we asked her to try one again.

I appreciate the help here. I'll keep you informed as to the direction we go.


Last edited by mquillen on Fri Dec 11, 2009 3:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Thu Dec 10, 2009 1:12 pm
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Dee, thanks for your understanding. My mother-in-law also has a charming personality, and her doctor always seemed to have a real fondness for her. Even now, he's not sure of her mental decline, even though the Ohio Psych Center gave her a GFA of 25 upon entering the unit, and a 45 upon leaving.

As we know, there are no clear cut paths down this road, and I appreciate all the input from everyone here. I'll keep you informed, but I'm working to get a referral to OSU Neurology. It will be interesting to see what her doctor writes. This is the same doctor my wife and I used to go to. I've always prodded my wife to get her "well baby" physicals and such. The doctors wife works as the receptionist in his office and she can't understand why my wife would make a doctor's appointment when she feels fine--I'm dead serious. I quit going to this doctor long ago--I think he'd rather do physicals for the football team than anything else.


Thu Dec 10, 2009 1:27 pm
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Actually, if you look up the DSM-IV description of dementia, you will not see any mention of psychosis! From an MD's point of view, dementia is one thing, psychosis is another.


Thu Dec 10, 2009 8:59 pm
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Robin, are you referring to my statement regarding the GAF, or are you referring to my statement regarding depression? As you know depression can produce and exacerbate the symptoms of dementia.

The GAF does not distinguish the reasons for the funtioning or lack of thereof.

Lastly, delusions are not only caused by psychosis. There is a possibility that she is suffering from late onset schiz, but 95 is really late.

I'm really not trying to be argumentative, so I'm sorry if it seems that way.
You know more about this than me, but one of the challenges is to understand the root cause(s) of her issues, and for a 95 year old it isn't that simple. Physically she was healthy as an ox, and she is physically healthy now. She was fine until she broke her hip. The hip healed great, the mind did not. There is a correlation between hip fracture, delerium post surgery (which she experienced), and dementia, that is not clearly understood.


Fri Dec 11, 2009 11:35 am
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I don't know what a GAF is. I'm referring to the DSM-IV description of dementia. This is a book for psychiatrists. (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition)

Psychosis = delusions and hallucinations

I won't post further in this topic.


Fri Dec 11, 2009 12:39 pm
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Robin, it's obviously up to you whether or not you post further on the topic. I was just trying to understand what you were getting at. I'm familiar with the DSM-IV.

The GAF is the "Global Assessment Functioning" scale used by mental health clinicians to assess the pschological functioning of mental health patients. It is also referred to in the DSM-IV, so I suggest you read it more closely if you're going to refer to it often.

And you are wrong, dementia can and does induce symptoms of psychosis, they are not necessarily mutually exclusive.


Fri Dec 11, 2009 2:50 pm
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